Are there Really Health and Safety Issues in the Office?

It is important to be aware of these potential hazards. Both the employees as well as the employers need to be aware of these dangers, simply by identifying each of them.

Some of the most common issues include: noise, hazardous substances, manual handling, display screen equipment and different kinds of machinery. Wet or slippery floors are unsafe. Parking spaces that are covered should have enough light for clear visibility.

The machines and equipment present at the workplace should be in a good working order so that they do not pose any kind of harm to the people working in the office.

Trained personnel should be available to handle and repair any type of problem issue. A systematic approach to health and safety issues prevails in an office. These might need identification and risk assessment, to control these factors.

Physical injuries can occur in the offices. These include muscular-skeletal disorders, which may affect the back, hands, legs or neck. Other injuries can include cuts or lacerations and any instance where someone might trip or fall. These can vary in their severity depending on the type of accident.

Stress related conditions definitely exist in the office and are a major source of many health problems. The actual stress is due to the frequency and duration of certain conditions.

Other health and safety factors can also have an impact on the employees’ health and productivity. These include: smoking, ventilation, humidity and lighting.

Contaminated air and heat due to photocopying machines and computers can have a negative impact on an employee’s productivity and effectiveness.

Accidents in the workplace happen from time to time. This proves that there are many hazards in the workplace. The employees who experience these health and safety issues are either unaware of these hazards or they become a victim to them.

It is important to be aware of these potential hazards. Both the employees as well as the employers need to be aware of these dangers, simply by identifying each of them.

Some of the most common issues include: noise, hazardous substances, manual handling, display screen equipment and different kinds of machinery. Wet or slippery floors are unsafe.

Parking spaces that are covered should have enough light for clear visibility. The machines and equipment present at the workplace should be in a good working order so that they do not pose any kind of harm to the people working in the office.

Trained personnel should be available to handle and repair any type of problem issue. A systematic approach to health and safety issues prevails in an office. These might need identification and risk assessment, to control these factors.

Physical injuries can occur in the offices. These include muscular-skeletal disorders, which may affect the back, hands, legs or neck. Other injuries can include cuts or lacerations and any instance where someone might trip or fall. These can vary in their severity depending on the type of accident.

Stress related conditions definitely exist in the office and are a major source of many health problems. The actual stress is due to the frequency and duration of certain conditions.

Other health and safety factors can also have an impact on the employees’ health and productivity. These include: smoking, ventilation, humidity and lighting.

Contaminated air and heat due to photocopying machines and computers can have a negative impact on an employee’s productivity and effectiveness.

Stress in the Workplace: Past, Present and the Future
by: Jack Dunham
publisher: Wiley, published: 2000-11-17
ASIN: 1861561814
EAN: 9781861561817
sales rank: 727723
price: $53.30 (new), $44.10 (used)

This volume consists of nine chapters written by internationally known research workers. It begins with a psychosocial framework for understanding sickness and health in the workplace, then gives an account of research with executives in industry and the US Air Force. Tores Theorell focuses his research on the increasing demands on workers and the diminishing control they have over their working lives. Johannes Siegrist is concerned with imbalance – in this case between effort and reward at work. Then there is a report on the effects of the increase of mergers and acquisitions in the 1990s, and an examination of the stress of working for clearing banks, merchant banks and foreign-owned banks in London and New York. The next chapter presents evidence of the sources of stress for women in managerial positions. Cheryl Travers analyzes the rising costs of teacher stress and then Michiel Kompier and Tage Kristensen make recommendations for planning and implementation stress management strategies in the workplace.

My Office Is Killing Me!: The Sick Building Survival Guide
by: Jeffrey C. May
publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press, published: 2006-03-17
ASIN: 0801883423
EAN: 9780801883422
sales rank: 813560
price: $0.99 (new), $0.01 (used)

Bacteria and mold may lurk undetected in carpets or in the heating or cooling system of your office or school. When inhaled, the by-products of these organisms can cause allergy and asthma symptoms. Chemical vapors emitted by office furniture and equipment may also foul the air we breathe indoors, causing headaches, eye irritation, or other symptoms. Here the author of the best-selling My House Is Killing Me! and co-author of The Mold Survival Guide turns his attention to indoor air quality in public buildings. Blending his extensive professional experience with scientific explanations, May helps us see these buildings through the eyes of a building scientist, microscopist, and organic chemist. He offers a step-by-step approach to identifying, controlling, and often eliminating the sources of indoor air pollutants and allergens. Whether it’s a case of mold in an elementary school or inadequate ventilation in a high-rise office building, this valuable guide can help people cope when the air they breathe indoors is making them sick.

Office Safety DVD – Safety training video for the office – Safetycare free preview
This program has been produced to inform and educate on the safety issues that exist in the office environment. It looks at the common and often overlooked h…

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